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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Some chemical characteristics of green and dead lodgepole pine and western white pine found in the catalog.

Some chemical characteristics of green and dead lodgepole pine and western white pine

Peter J. Lieu

Some chemical characteristics of green and dead lodgepole pine and western white pine

by Peter J. Lieu

  • 243 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lodgepole pine.,
  • Western white pine.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPeter J. Lieu, Rick G. Kelsey, and Fred Shafizadeh.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research note INT -- 256.
    ContributionsKelsey, Rick G., Shafizadeh, Fred., Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination8 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17654151M

    Background. Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) is found in western North America, extending from the Yukon into British Columbia and Washington, and along the Rocky Mountains and eastern slopes to Colorado [].Jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) is a closely related species found east of the Rockies, mainly in Canada’s boreal forest from the Author: Catherine Cullingham, Sophie Dang, Corey Davis, Barry Cooke, David Coltman, Janice Cooke. Learn pine with free interactive flashcards. Choose from different sets of pine flashcards on Quizlet.

    Mountain Pine Beetle In Rocky Mountain National Park, clusters of yellow, red, and brown dead or dying pine trees stand out noticeably against the greens of the surrounding landscape. It is very likely that they are ponderosa or lodgepole pine trees that have been infested with the Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa). In some western forest systems, for example fire-dependent lodgepole pine forests, the influence of a single disturbance agent, such as wildfire, is so pervasive that it dominates forest dynamics. In most low to mid-elevation ponderosa pine forests, the relatively rapid accumulation of fuels and weather conditions required for fire ignition and Cited by:

    most important hosts of the mountain pine beetle on the basis of commercial value and intensity of beetle epidemics are lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas var. latifolia Engel­ n\ann), ponderosa pine (P. ponderosa Lawson), western white pine (P,. montico/a Douglas), and sugar pine (P. lambertiana Douglas). for many western forests (Schmidt ). Some pines species, such as lodgepole pine, are maintained by periodic disturbances. The lodge­ pole pine forest-type' typically is an essential mo­ noculture of even-aged trees that were initiated by a catastrophic, stand-replacing fire. Without the influence of fire (Fig. 1 B), lodgepole pine would be.


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Some chemical characteristics of green and dead lodgepole pine and western white pine by Peter J. Lieu Download PDF EPUB FB2

The chemical components and combustion characteristics of dead and live lodgepole pine and western white pine were determined. Except for small variations, the chemical composition and burning characteristics of sound dead wood were nearly identical to the corresponding live wood for both species.

Therefore, dead wood could be utilized as a source of chemicals, fuel, and as a. Some chemical characteristics of green and dead lodgepole pine and western white pine.

Ogden, Utah: Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. except jack pine (Pinus banksiana), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea).

Jack pine is a relatively small, short-lived, early successional tree occurring in the eastern and central parts of taiga east of the Rocky Mountains. Lodgepole pine is a longer-lived, early successional species growing in western Canada. Lodgepole pine is mature around years, and the maximum age is to years.

There is little shade in some mature, open, single-aged stands of Lodgepole pine, and little living ground cover. The ground is littered with fallen dead pine limbs and trunks, sometimes even piles of Size: KB. dead timber is the result of a mountain pine beetle epidemic.

The white pine species in western Montana and northern Idaho has also been severely hit by this insect and by the white pine blister rust. One National Forest in north Idaho has an estimated billion cubic feet of dead standing and down timber, most of which is western white pine.

Population Size. Score 0 - Large: Generally >, individuals. Range Extent. Score 0 - Widespread species within Montana (occurs in 5% or more of the state or generally occurring in 6 or more sub-basins.) as well as outside of Montana.

Area of Occupancy. Score 0 - High: Occurs in >25 Subwatersheds (6th Code HUC’s). Environmental Specificity. Score 0 - Low: Species. in regions of the western United States that produce softwood timber. One such region is the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon, where extensive stands of dead lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.

ex Loud.) are the result of an outbreak of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus spp.) in the ’s and ’s (fig. The slowCited by: 4. Lodgepole pine plots were ha cir-cular plots. In 39 plots, fewer than five trees with 13 cm at DBH were in each plot, so these were expanded to ha, and one plot was expanded to ha.

Ponderosa pine forests were Fig 1. Aerial photograph showing locations of lodgepole and ponderosa pine sites in relation to the Neola North wildfire. ecology and fire behavior.

And lodgepole pine trees in all three types are vulnerable to attack by mountain pine beetles. Lodgepole Pine Ecology Lodgepole pine is found over a large area in western North America, from north-western Canada in the northern Rocky Mountains; Wash-ington, Oregon, and California in the Cascades and SierraCited by: Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines for Land Managers in the Wildland-Urban Interface As a consequence of the current mountain pine beetle epidemic, many landowners and land managers are concerned about how to actively manage lodgepole pine stands to: 1) treat the dead standing trees killed by the insects,File Size: 1MB.

The North American mushrooms are large white fungus while the ones from Japan are a dark, rich-brown color.

The pine mushroom is harvested in fall from under Lodgepole or Jack pine trees nestled amongst pine needles and moss. The mushroom is purportedly very difficult to grow, but you can find spore on some specialty mycelium sites.

We examined the effects of low-impact broadcast-burning and disk-trenching planting position (control, hinge, trench) on soil characteristics and lodgepole pine foliar nutrition and growth over two decades at a subboreal site in British Columbia, Canada. Broadcast burning had virtually no effect on either the bulk density or chemical properties of soil.

In contrast, significant Cited by: 4. A lodgepole pine tree is blackened and dead from pine beetle infestations in Walden, Colorado on April 7, Forests from Canada to Mexico and the Pacific Northwest to the South have been affected beetle infestation that cause the death of various species of pine trees.

barked trees. Lodgepole pine and western white pine are examples of this type. Experiments have shown that the method is not appli- cable to trees that have thick bark, such as yellow pine and sugar pine, since the thickness of the bark of these trees acts as an insulator preventing the surface heat from reaching the beetle broods, which.

the pine cone beetle. This insect compounds the problem of infrequent seed years and is a serious threat to white pine management.

Diseases, including white pine blister rust, red ring rot, root rot, wood decay, and certain needle fungi, cause losses in white pine stands. Such natural elements as snow, ice, and wind may also cause damage to. Moisture content of lumber produced from dead western white pine and lodgepole pine trees / View Metadata By: Lowery, David P.

- Hearst, Allen, L. - Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah). western North American forests. If not directly killed by A. americanum, trees are made vulnerable to secondary agents,like the Pine engraver beetle, that can kill ole Pines are also susceptible to red belt, or winter burn, which is winter drying damage caused by alternating chilling and warming of the needles combined with low humidity.

Other Common Names/Trade Names: Western Yellow Pine Scientific Name: Pinus contorta, Pinus pondersoa Best Characteristics for Identification: Resin canals, abrupt transition from earlywood to latewood.

Resinous odor, resin pockets. Uses: Plywood, Framing lumber, poles, log cabins General Natural Range: Lodgepole pine: Yukon territory south through British Columbia. Colorado’s major tree species include bristlecone pine, Colorado blue spruce, Douglas-fir, Engelmann spruce, limber pine, lodgepole pine, narrowleaf cottonwood, quaking aspen, piñon pine, plains cottonwood, ponderosa pine, Rocky Mountain juniper, subalpine fir and white fir.

Characteristics & Descriptions. Bristlecone Pine. Engelmann Spruce. Pinus ponderosa, commonly known as the ponderosa pine, bull pine, blackjack pine, western yellow-pine, or filipinus pine is a very large pine tree species of variable habitat native to mountainous regions of western North is the most widely distributed pine species in North America.: 4 Pinus ponderosa grows in various erect forms from British Columbia Family: Pinaceae.

A pine is any conifer in the genus Pinus (/ ˈ p iː n uː s /) of the family Pinaceae. Pinus is the sole genus in the subfamily Plant List compiled by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanical Garden accepts species names of pines as current, together with 35 unresolved species and many more synonyms.

Pine may also refer to the lumber derived from Class: Pinopsida. Lodgepole pine is one of the most widely distributed conifers in North America.

The adaptations of lodgepole pine to severe, stand-replacement fire–in particular its serotinous cones–have long been acknowledged. Less well-known is that lodgepole pine forests also burn in low- to mixed-severity fire, resulting in patchy and variable patterns.• Lodgepole pine’s lifecycle usually starts and ends with a crown fire.

• Lodgepole pine is not Ponderosa pine. Stands aren’t unnaturally dense and frequent fires not part of their ecology. • MPB are a natural part of the ecosystem, help lower risk of crown fire and help reset the system.

• Effects of MPB don’t last forever.